Pinus strobus

Eastern White Pine
One of our more stately native evergreens
Price Code: 
$7.50/gal; $12.50/2 gal. $16.50/larger specimens
Status: 
In Stock

Pinus strobus is found in the temperate broadleaf and mixed forests of eastern North America. It prefers well-drained soil and cool, humid climates, but can also grow in boggy areas and rocky highlands.  It provides food and shelter for numerous forest birds, such as the Red Crossbill, and small mammals such as squirrels.

It makes a nice windbreak, as it grows relatively fast, with good canopy cover.  Eastern white pine forests originally covered much of northeastern North America. Only one percent of the old-growth forests remain after the extensive logging operations that existed from the 18th century into the early 20th century.

From Wikipedia: Eastern white pine needles contain five times the amount of Vitamin C (by weight) of lemons[citation needed] and make an excellent herbal tea. The cambium is edible. It is also a source of resveratrol. Linnaeus noted in the 18th century that cattle and pigs fed pine bark bread grew well, but he personally did not like the taste. Caterpillars of Lusk's Pinemoth (Coloradia luski) have been found to feed only on Pinus strobus.

Pine tar is produced by slowly burning pine roots, branches, or small trunks in a partially smothered flame. Pine tar mixed with beer can be used to remove tapeworms (flat worms) or nematodes (round worms). Pine tar mixed with sulfur is useful to treat dandruff, and marketed in present-day products. Pine tar can also be processed to make turpentine.

Native American traditional uses: The name “Adirondack” is an Iroquois word which means tree-eater and referred to their neighbors (more commonly known as the Algonquians) who collected the inner bark of this tree, Picea rubens, and others during times of winter starvation. The white soft inner bark (cambial layer) was carefully separated from the hard, dark brown bark and dried. When pounded this product can be used as flour or added to stretch other starchy products.

The young staminate cones were stewed by the Ojibwe Indians with meat and were said to be sweet and not pitchy. In addition, the seeds are sweet and nutritious, but not as tasty as those of some of the western nut pines

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